Adlib Audio Launches AA Install Speaker Range

adlib-speakersLiverpool based Adlib Audio launches a new specialist division – Adlib Speakers – to manufacture and market its AA brand of speakers, which are very proudly made in Liverpool, England. Hand-crafted and designed to perfection by a dedicated team of individuals who know their audio, using quality components, precision engineering and innovation, the AA series intends to be the ultimate ‘boutique’ brand for those who understand that their sound really matters. Adlib has been making, installing and using the AA range very successfully for the last 15 years, primarily for its own installations and projects, and now they believe the time has come to step up and make the AA series available for re-sale worldwide.

Currently there are four products available for re-sale in the AA range – the AA61, AA81 and AA121 – containing 6, 8 and 12 inch drivers respectively, complete with a dedicated AA12HL 12 inch sub. All the AA series cabinets are constructed from premium birch ply sourced in Finland, and are available with a hard-wearing textured paint exterior for installs. A huge amount of quality engineering and detail goes into manufacturing the AA range all featuring the best components, custom speaker chassis, compression drivers and Adlib’s own custom crossover networks.

www.adlibspeakers.co.uk

The March 2014 Issue of audioXpress is Now Online

This month’s audioXpress brings a great article from our regular contributor Thomas Perazella, in which he revisits the art of studio reamping and the different approaches and implications of that two-stage studio process. During the process, we first record a dry or clean track and then re-record the track by sending the clean track back through amplifiers and effects. Naturally, he looks at different Reamp circuits and some implications for the different impedance audio signals and balance to unbalance challenges.

audioXpress March 2014Another highlight is our review of the Rockruepel comp.two tube stereo compressor, hand built by Oliver Gregor in Germany. As Miguel Marques discovers, this is one of the most versatile audio processors on the market, packaged in a simple but impressive design.

Following the first of a two-part article dedicated to Dante audio networks, our Standards Review revisits Audinate from the perspective of those companies who have licensed the technology.

And for our readers who have are interested in the recently introduced loudness standards, Jon Schorah returns with another great article about Loudness Meters and Measurements.

Don’t miss another take from Mike Klasco and Steve Tatarunis on the “Weird Science Woofers,” in which they discuss some market innovations and pure research on unique speaker mechanisms, from huge to ultra-shallow speaker configurations.

In this month’s Sound Control column, Richard Honeycutt explores predictive acoustics and how the results of such evaluations can be highly rewarding.

Certainly an entertaining read is Shannon Becker’s interview this month with Morten Sissener, founder of Tortuga Audio, a DIY-oriented audio company dedicated and committed to audio enjoyment.

On the subject of DIY projects, this month contributor George Ntanavaras explains how to build his MC100 high-quality moving coil RIAA preamplifier. It is a great read for anyone who would like to know more about the phono signal chain.

And for Audio Electronics enthusiasts, Ron Tipton shares a fascinating project on testing a Class-T or Tripath power amplifier. We also discuss the story of Tripath Technology, which was later acquired by Cirrus Logic who discontinued the company operations. We also speculate on reasons why the Tripath ICs are still popular among the DIY audio community.

And for those with a passion for tubes, columnist Richard Honeycutt looks at Tube Guitar Amplifiers and why distortion evolved from an undesirable effect to part of the established guitar amplification industry practice.

Your new issue of audioXpress is now available at www.gotomyxpress.com

Prescient Audio Awarded at CES 2014 For Its Revolutionary ThinDriver TD-12

Prescient Audio ThinDriver

Prescient Audio ThinDriver

Prescient Audio, from Rockford, IL, a consumer and professional audio manufacturer of high-performance loudspeaker technology, was named an International CES Innovations 2014 Design and Engineering Awards Honoree for its ThinDriver TD-12, in the High Performance Home Audio product category.

Prescient Audio’s TD-12 is the thinnest and lightest 12″ subwoofer available on the market, boasting an energy-efficient design. The TD-12 is a high-performance, 1,000-W loudspeaker that repositions the components from behind the loudspeaker to its perimeter. With a mounted depth of 2.25″, the TD-12 is the shallowest subwoofer available.

Its futuristic design allows for a smaller cabinet, requiring only 0.5 cubic feet of box volume. It can easily fit between standard wall joints within a wall cavity or underneath furniture or car seats. While it’s the thinnest loudspeaker profile in the industry, it still provides a rich, superior true-to-signal sound and incredible bass throughout all audible levels, all while offering the largest power-to-weight ratio in the industry at 120-W per pound.

According to Paul Niedermann, CEO of Prescient Audio, the ThinDriver TD-12 has been three years in the making and is now available.

www.prescientaudio.com

The January 2014 Edition of audioXpress is Now Available Online!

Our first issue for the New Year highlights the main technologies and product launches at the 135th Audio Engineering Society (AES) Convention, one of the best audio engineering-related events in the US. While there, AES celebrated its 65th anniversary. And, of course, the convention was also a special event for us, marking the official presentation of the redesigned and reenergized audioXpress magazine!

In our What’s News section, we discuss HARMAN’s acquisition of Duran Audio, which was announced during the 135th AES Convention, and we detail the Dutch company’s valuable technologies and its history.

Our review for the month reveals a great stereo compressor in a 500-series format from the Polish company IGS Audio. Miguel Marques enjoyed his examination of the S-Type 500 VCA compressor and details the features and circuitry of this remake of a classic.

AX_012014Jan_360pxIn the final article of our three-part series “Tips to Resurrect a Classic Speaker or Design a New System,” Thomas Perazella confirms that a new woofer and a few DSP corrections can significantly improve the original Heil air motion transformer’s sound quality.

And for those who enjoy DIY audio, we have The Twin-T Oscillator, an audio oscillator and stereo VU meter design by Larry Cicchinelli. The easy-to-use unit combines a calibrated audio source with a level display.

In our Standards Review column, we discuss the new AES67-2013 Networked Audio-Over-IP (AoIP) Interoperability Standard and all the implications for the audio industry.

The issue also includes the third article in the series “The Lowdown on Woofers, Subwoofers, and Bass Shakers,” in which Mike Klasco and Steve Tatarunis look inside a few drivers and compare subwoofers and woofers.

For those audiophiles who follow Richard Honeycutt’s column, Sound Control, you will be glad to know that he addresses the difficult question of “Sound Isolation” and discusses the options when acousticians are asked the cost to “soundproof” a certain room.

Richard Honeycutt also begins a new series of articles dedicated to “The Development of Tube Guitar Amplifiers” in his respected Hollow-State Electronics column.

Finally, our own Shannon Becker interviews entrepreneurs Jason Lucash and Mike Szymczak, founders of OrigAudio, a really interesting company with great concepts for “foldable” speakers and other unique ideas.

Check it out at: www.gotomyxpress.com or visit audioxpress.com for information on how you can receive a monthly copy wherever you go.

PreSonus Shipping New StudioLive AI-series Active Integration Loudspeakers

The new line includes the full-range StudioLive 312AI, 315AI, and 328AI 3-way powered speakers and the StudioLive 18sAI powered subwoofer. All models use custom drivers, Class-D amplifiers, wireless and wired networking and communications with powerful DSP to create a unified working environment. The StudioLive AI-series speakers incorporate Fulcrum Acoustics’ TQ Temporal Equalization algorithms, using multiple, fully addressable Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filters to eliminate horn reflections and to correct linear time and amplitude anomalies in coaxial systems. Collaborating with Fulcrum Acoustics’ co-founder, Dave Gunness, PreSonus software designers incorporated custom TQ algorithms with dynamics processing, FFT tools, and performance monitoring into the onboard DSP.

www.presonus.com/products/live-sound-reinforcement

Powersoft D-Cell504 IS Modules Drive Unique “Wall of Bass”

Wall Of Bass

Wall Of Bass

Powersoft D-Cell504 IS high-power amplifier modules have been designed to drive a unique “Wall of Bass” (as low as 7 Hz) in an Austrian nightclub.

The newly-reconstructed Club SUB, in the city of Wiener Neustadt, set out to integrate a perfect low-frequency solution, capable of reproducing a wide range of live and DJ-derived music (e.g., Drum ‘n’ Bass, Dubstep, and Techno) and arts presentations, as well as workshops and theatrical performance in a completely revolutionary way.

And since the 300-capacity club is located in a heavily populated residential area emphasis needed to be placed on acoustic isolation.

Project managers, Wolfgang Sauter (from Pro Performance) and Reinhard Nell (from Lambda Labs), were equal to the challenge.

Lambda Labs German-based director, Steffen Kroschel, said, “The owners’ goal was to achieve a similar sound performance as it had in the Grelle Forelle Club in Vienna. Given the concerns of local residents, when Mr. Sauter surveyed the building, with its tube like architecture, the abstract idea of a ‘vibrating wall’ became more logical.”

He contacted Lambda Labs where Richard Nell supported the concept with simulation data, parameters, and measurements— applying his knowledge of high-performance concrete “closed box” enclosures and amping. The drivers were developed especially for this application, going through 10 prototype stages, while the club owners helped with casting the concrete loudspeaker enclosures.

For the rear wall, behind the 6 m × 5 m stage, 400-kg special concrete blocks were cast and set into a 6 m × 3 m wall, using 13 tons of heavy concrete and a further 35 tons for the foundation—requiring a monumental effort. “It was extremely difficult to handle these enclosures with small forklift trucks and build the 50 cm deep low-frequency absorber,” said Kroschel. “Behind the wall is sand, and under the wall, Mr. Sauter chose material that is used for highway construction.”

Wall Of Bass raw concrete castings

Wall Of Bass raw concrete castings

Each concrete block serves as a loudspeaker enclosure with a pressure-resistant rear chamber that implements the perfect impulse response of a “closed-box” design and maximizes the radiation resistance of the woofers through the acoustically hard surface. A self-enveloped 15” speaker was produced and adapted to the unusual demands of this project. The single chassis are designed to act together like one single swinging wall—in a similar principle to a piston in a cylinder.

Kroschel explained, “A perfect plane wave is created in the interior of the club, which naturally moves along the side walls and doesn’t induce any room modes. The rear of the main floor was converted into a single bass trap to absorb the incoming wave. The SUB thereby achieves an acoustical result that could never be reached even outdoors.”

Outside, virtually no noise escapes. And Nell and Sauter, agree that “such an operating range and evenness of the low frequencies is overwhelming.”

But to achieve this optimum performance, every driver needed be powered by its own dedicated amplifier module to take advantage of the shortest cable runs, matching power supplies, and impedance data. Nell chose Powersoft, a longtime partner of Lambda Labs, to provide amping for the “Wall of Bass.” Lambda Labs supported the installation with items like amplifier mounting frames.

The 32 Lambda Labs OEM CX 15” ultra-long excursion drivers, with ± 25-mm linear excursion capability, are set in housings made from special concrete. Each is driven by 800-W amplifying modules, with the maximum desired sound pressure level (SPL) reached at an excursion of only ±3 mm. Therefore, the “Wall of Bass” only uses 500-W peak music power during operation, which sets new standards of energy efficiency.

Via their two-channel 32 D-Cell504 IS amp modules, Powersoft delivered 25,600-W amping power, including four-in voice coil with a custom-made venting system that has a hardened membrane.

Integrated within an aluminum heatsink panel, the D-Cell504 IS provides an interface panel with input volume potentiometer, double XLR for mono input and link out or stereo input operation, four LEDs for limit, clip, signal, and ready, with a four-LED preset selection button to show the preset in use. Easy access to the DSP mounted on board, is further facilitated via remote control capabilities provided by Powersoft’s proprietary Armonía Pro Audio Suite.

For more information, visit www.powersoft-audio.com

Wall Of Bass

Wall Of Bass

PreSonus Ships Ultra-Compact E4.5 Studio Reference Monitor

PreSonus E4.5 Ultra-Compact Studio Reference Monitor

PreSonus E4.5 Ultra-Compact Studio Reference Monitor

PreSonus is shipping the ultra-compact Eris E4.5 studio reference monitor, the third model in the Eris series of two-way monitor speakers announced one year ago, at the NAMM 2013. As with the Eris E5 and E8, the E4.5 can be user-adjusted to the acoustic space, allowing to create a more accurate listening environment or to simulate different common listening environments.

A four-position Acoustic Space switch controls a second-order shelving filter, centered at 1 kHz, providing three attenuation points (no attenuation, -2 dB, and -4 dB), allowing control of the bass response relative to the wall proximity. A High Pass switch sets the low-frequency cutoff (second-order slope, -12 dB/octave) to be flat, 80 Hz, or 100 Hz, with a continuously adjustable (±6 dB) High Frequency and Midrange controls, allowing a linear response for accurate monitoring.

This affordable new monitor speaker features balanced ¼” TRS, unbalanced RCA and unbalanced 1/8” inputs, being ideal for bedroom studios, school music programs, and as a high-quality replacement for computer speakers.

The Eris E4.5 features a 4.5-inch, Kevlar low-frequency transducer, a 1-inch (25 mm), silk-dome, high-frequency tweeter, and a rear bass-reflect port. A 25W Class AB amplifier powers each speaker, SPL is rated at 100 dB and frequency response is from 70 Hz up to 20 kHz.

The Eris E4.5 anticipated MAP/street price is $199.95/pair.

www.presonus.com/products/Eris

The December 2013 Edition of audioXpress is Now Available Online

In this month’s issue, you can read our review of the elysia xfilter 500, an extraordinary equalizer “Made in Germany” in a 500-series format that offers a precise stereo image based on computer-selected, stepped potentiometers and low-tolerance film capacitors. In our Standards Review column, we address the new Audiobus and Apple’s Inter-App Audio technologies for iOS platforms. The T&M series offers the second part of the excellent “Designing for Ultra-Low THD+N” article by Bruce Hofer. Read more about reinventing low-frequency devices to fit compact sizes in the Mike Klasco and Steve Tatarunis series, “The Lowdown on Woofers, Subwoofers, and Bass Shakers.” And don’t forget our monthly Sound Control article series in which Richard Honeycutt discusses absorption and why it is considered “The Oldest Tool in the Modern Acoustician’s Toolbox.”

In this issue, Shannon Becker interviews Ken Heng Gin Loo and learns why DIY audio projects appeal to this applications engineer.

In our project-oriented section, you can read about The Cathedrals speaker system designed by Ken Bird and read our second serving on “Tips to Resurrect a Classic Speaker or Design a New System” by Thomas Perazella. Also, find out how to “Build a Sound Level Meter and Spectrum Analyzer” in another great project article by Ron Tipton.

Check it out at www.gotomyxpress.com

Visit audioxpress.com/subscriptions for information on how you can receive a monthly magazine copy wherever you go.

Mackie Adds The MRmk3 Series

MackieMRmk3SeriesThe new MRmk3 Series Studio Monitors were among the highlights when Mackie recently refreshed the line. The MRmk3 Series includes three affordable, professional monitors with optimized electronics and custom-matched amplifiers/drivers, complemented by a powerful subwoofer (MR10Smk3). Featuring custom-tuned ports and rugged all-wood MDF cabinets packed with acoustic absorption material, the new Mackie MRmk3 full-range monitors include the 5.25” MR5mk3, the 6.5” MR6mk3, and the 8” MR8mk3.

The Mackie MRmk3 are active monitors specifically designed to reveal the full frequency range in music recording and mixing, optimized with a minimum-diffraction waveguide system and different sized polypropylene woofers together with a 1” silk dome tweeter and Class-A/B amplifiers rated from 50 to 120 WRMS.

All the units feature high- and low-frequency level adjustments with 100-Hz and 3.25-kHz shelving in the rear panels, featuring XLR, TRS, and RCA input connectors.

Mackie
www.mackie.com

KRK Systems Launches New Rokit Generation 3 Monitors

KRK Systems, now part of the Gibson Pro Audio division, claims it is the leader in the worldwide home studio market when it comes to powered monitors. KRK Systems is certainly one of the world’s most respected studio reference monitor manufacturers. So, when the company decided to refresh its popular Rokits, now in its third generation, there must have been a good reason.

KRKg3-familyWithout dramatic changes, the new Rokit G3 family shows a cleaner more refined look and finishing, with “radiused” edges that help reduce distortion from diffraction. The monitors now offer a new 1” soft dome tweeter and new glass-Aramid composite woofers. The changes expand the Rokit’s frequency response up to 35 kHz, with better vocal clarity and extended bass response from 35 Hz. The proprietary bi-amped, Class-A/B amplifier provides SPL up to 109 dB and the waveguide design helps achieve the detailed imaging, while the front-firing bass port reduces boundary coupling to enable flexible room positioning. One of the key changes is in the back of the monitors, where high-frequency adjustments can be found to tailor the system to the user’s personal taste. The low-frequency adjustments compensate for room acoustics.

KRK Sytems, Inc.
www.krksys.com