Industry Watch: April 2014

N.E.A.R. Returns to the Outdoor Speaker Market

New England Audio Resource (N.E.A.R., which was originally called New England Audio Research) was founded in 1988 by Bill Kieltyka. Interestingly, the company purchased a lot of the transducer tooling from Rudy Bozak, and its line was always based, as with Bozak, on aluminum cone woofers and tweeters. (For a period of time, I designed the networks for the entire N.E.A.R. line of two-channel and home-theater speakers).

The company also originally held the patent for a magnetic fluid technology that replaced the ubiquitous cloth spider to supply compliance to woofers. (Sony is now using this technique in some of its current speaker line ups, following the patent’s expiration.)

Bogen Communications acquired N.E.A.R. in 1997. Bogen kept the name going for a couple of years, but it ultimately closed the company and kept Kieltyka as an employee.

Although the N.E.A.R. name has been absent from the market for more than 14 years, Bogen is bringing it back with a new line of outdoor loudspeaker products.

N.E.A.R.’s first residential lineup in years includes the LB4, the LB5, the LB6, and the LB8, which are all full-range bracket-mount speakers. They will be available in white and black. The lineup also includes the IG 5, the IG 6, and the IG 8, which are full-range speakers designed to be placed on the ground or partially buried. An eighth speaker, the IGS 12 band-pass subwoofer, is also designed to be partially buried. The speakers can be driven by the NEAR 6XL amplifier, which delivers 2 × 600-W output into either 70-V or 8-Ω loads.

In the 8-Ω versions, the bracket-mount LB4, LB5, LB6, and LB8 cost $279, $499, $579, and $679 each, respectively. The 70-V versions for large homes and yards cost $319, $539, $619, and $719 each, respectively. The in- and on-ground IG5, IG6, and IG8 speakers can be used in 8-Ω and 70-V installs and cost $619, $779, and $859, respectively. The partial-buried IGS12 band-pass subwoofer ($1,599) drives either 8-Ω or multi-tap 70-V install. The beehive-shaped IG and IGS models will be available in a terra cotta color.

The speakers and subwoofer can be driven by the 2 × 600-W 6XL amplifier ($1,599) with selectable high- and low-pass crossovers and a low-frequency contour to extend bass performance below 40 Hz. A summing circuit enables stereo material to be combined into both channels.

All four LB speakers feature a patent-pending lever bracket for a tool-free final installation, the company said. The four two-way models use metal-cone spiderless woofers and 1” aluminum inverted-dome tweeters. The coaxial driver arrangement of the LB6 and LB8 and the close proximity of the woofer and tweeter in the LB4 and LB5 provide consistent dispersion for horizontal and vertical placement, according to the company.

The on- and in-ground IG speakers also feature metal cone spiderless drivers, which N.E.A.R. said can operate under water. But the company also adopted a domed woofer design in these models to shed water that may otherwise collect in a cone. The design also improves audio linearity, the company said.

A water-shedding grille prevents moisture from entering “under all but the most extreme conditions,” the company added. The frame of the coaxial-driver assembly also directs away any water that may find its way in, N.E.A.R. added.

The IGS12 subwoofer features a 12” metal cone spiderless driver whose output fires through three horizontal slots about a third of the way from the enclosure’s top. The slots should be located just above ground level when the enclosure is buried. The openings are covered by a stainless grille and hydrophobic fabric.

 


RadioShack Plans Several Store Closings

According to various industry sources and the Wall Street Journal, RadioShack may be about to close about 11% of its stores. The chain is in the midst of a nearly year-long turnaround effort that includes updates of the company’s stores, product assortment, and brand image.

The iconic retailer lost $112 million in the third quarter, its seventh consecutive loss, as it jettisoned unproductive products, and secured $835 million in new financing in December. RadioShack operates about 4,300 stores in the US and 270 in Mexico. Another 1,000 franchised locations are run by independent dealers in the US and franchise operators abroad.

 


B&W Launches New Opening-Price Series

Bowers & Wilkins (B&W) recently unveiled a new opening-price series of in-room loudspeakers that incorporate technology from the company’s higher end lines to improve performance. The 600 series, which began shipping in March, includes the floor-standing 683 ($1,650/ pair), the smaller floor-standing 684 ($1,150/ pair), and the 685 ($700/pair), which can be placed on a stand or a bookshelf. The series also includes the 686 bookshelf ($550/pair), which is the most compact speaker in the series. The HTM61 center channel costs $750 each and the HTM62 center channel costs $450 each. All six models will join a trio of 600-series subwoofers, which will be available in black ash finish.

New technology used in the series includes double-dome tweeters derived from the company’s CM10 speaker. The tweeter features two separate aluminum domes, the second with its center portion cut out. The second dome is glued to the first dome’s rear face to deliver lightness and rigidity.

A new tweeter-decoupling design developed for the 600 series uses a gel ring to physically separate the double-dome tweeters from the cabinet. This prevents resonances from transferring between the baffle and tweeter. The design boosts clarity and delivers “outstanding imaging and dispersion,” according to B&W. The company also added the anti-resonance plugs for mid/bass drivers, used in B&W’s PM-1 speaker, which, again according to B&W delivers smoother response and lower distortion when driven hard.

Another new technology developed specifically for the new 600 series is a dual-layer aluminum bass driver, which features an aluminum bass cone reinforced with a second layer of aluminum around its periphery to deliver more effective damping and a higher break-up frequency to reduce distortion. The dual-layer aluminum design appears in the top floor-standing model.

 


The Bluetooth Speaker Craze Continues

The Bluetooth speaker craze shows no end in sight, which means that more people are listening to music on their smartphones. Here are some of the latest product releases in this category.

MB Quart—Car audio brand MB Quart (acquired by Maxxsonics in 2005) is getting into the portable audio market with the launch of four battery-powered Bluetooth speakers that cost $59 to $199. All products in this new line will be available in April in multiple colors. They feature battery lives ranging from 5 to 12 h. All will come with USB-charging capabilities, hands-free speakerphone capabilities, voice confirmation, and Bluetooth AVRCP to control basic music playback functions on Bluetooth-connected mobile devices.

The QUBOne ($59) features a single driver, a built-in microphone for hands-free calling, and two bottoms, to enable the unit to be placed on its side and keep the controls accessible. The rest have dual drivers but are mono.

The QUBTwo ($99) adds Bluetooth’s secure simple pairing profile, noise-canceling microphone, shock-resistant rubber housing, 8-h battery, and an input jack. The QUBThree ($149) includes a 10-h battery and tethering loop.

The QUBFour ($199) includes a 12-h battery and efficient neodymium magnets that, coupled with an amplifier that operates at a higher voltage, delivers louder sound with deeper bass. The QUBFour also contains dual-source Bluetooth technology to enable two mobile devices to be paired simultaneously to one speaker, making it easier to switch between two mobile devices for music playback. The speaker also includes a 110-V adapter. Apple mobile devices display the speaker’s battery status.

Bose—Bose released the SoundLink III, its latest portable Bluetooth speaker. The third-generation SoundLink Bluetooth speaker features longer battery life, higher output, and a new industrial design.

The $299 model extends playback time of its rechargeable lithium-ion battery by 30%, now lasting up to 14 h. The new model lacks its predecessor’s integrated bi-fold nylon cover, which doubled as a stand that angled the speaker. The new model stands upright on a flat surface. An optional $34 accessory cover is available in gray, blue, green, orange, and pink. The Bluetooth LED signal lights are also new and said to make pairing and switching Bluetooth devices easier. The SoundLink III stores the six most recently used Bluetooth devices in its memory making it unnecessary to pair a previously paired device.

The speaker also features a new DSP algorithm and improved electronics to play louder through four neodymium-magnet drivers and dual-opposing passive radiators, according to Bose. The industrial design has a fingerprint-resistant wraparound metal grille, rounded edges, and a silicone button panel on top to protect it against dirt and dust. The SoundLink III retains an auxiliary input, a microUSB for software updates, and an AC wall charger.

This speaker joins a smaller SoundLink Mini Bluetooth speaker ($199). The first SoundLink was introduced in 2011 and updated in 2012.

bēm wireless—Bluetooth-speaker supplier bēm wireless is launching the Wireless Speaker Band, which is a Bluetooth speaker that’s worn on the wrist and doubles as a hands-free speakerphone. The Speaker Band ($49) incorporates a speaker, a microphone, a spoken audio caller ID, an answer button, and compatibility with most voice-recognition apps. For music playback, it features play, pause, skip, and reverse buttons. Its rechargeable battery delivers up to 6 h of talk time. The device is promoted as a safer alternative to searching through a purse or pocket for a phone, especially if the phone owner is driving. The speaker band is available in six colors: black, white, blue, red, gray, and green. bēm, founded in 2012, manufactures portable Bluetooth speakers, including a boombox-style speaker with an integrated carrying handle.

Pyle Audio—Pyle Audio recently released a shower-friendly portable Bluetooth speaker/speakerphone. The Gator Sound waterproof speaker and speakerphone is a lightweight, waterproof unit with a hook for hanging on a shower head, a built-in microphone for hands-free calling, and a push-button control to connect to any Bluetooth-enabled device. It features a rechargeable lithium battery, a USB charging cable, enhanced bass production, and available in blue, white, or black ($49.99).

 


Majority of Soundbar Sales Below $500

GfK Group, the German market research giant, performed a year-long study of soundbar retail print ads and found advertised prices varied greatly throughout 2013. GfK was founded in 1934 by Professor Wilhelm Vershofen as a Nuremberg, Germany-based scientific institute, “Gesellschaft für Konsumforschung.” It was the birth of institutional market research in Germany.

With its recent study, the research firm noted that 89% of the soundbars advertised were priced around $500; however, as the year progressed, the focus shifted to lower-priced soundbars. In the early part of 2013, 50% of the advertising focused on sub-$300 models. This trend increased with the sub-$300 products comprising 70% of all soundbar advertising, according to GfK.

 


NRF Reports Expect Rise in Retail Sales

Retail sales are projected to rise 4.1% this year, which is somewhat improved over 3.7% gains in 2013. According to a report released by the National Retail Federation (NRF), continued economic growth and an expanding labor market and housing sector will help stoke consumer confidence and expenditures.

NRF’s published data forecasts a real gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 2.6% to 3%, the fastest in three years, and a decrease in the unemployment rate to near 6.5% or lower by December.

In 2014, retailers will be investing in faster fulfillment, mobile payment, in-store mobile marketing, and “name your own price” shopping tools. The sales projection includes most traditional retail categories (e.g., discounters, department stores, grocery stores, specialty stores, auto parts and accessories stores, and non-store categories). The sales projection excludes sales at automotive dealers, gas stations, and restaurants.

The April 2014 Issue of audioXpress is Now Online

AX-2014-04This month’s audioXpress reviews the different approaches in microphone placement techniques for capturing and recording unamplified acoustic music, particularly classical music. A recent study and AES presentation has reignited this issue and our author Gary Galo decided an historical perspective was needed in his article “Stereophonic Recording: What Do Listeners Prefer?”

In our usual review section, we give a listen to the new Focal Spirit Professional Headphones, the first effort of this kind from the prestigious French manufacturer. Miguel Marques tested the Focal Spirit Pros in a quest to discover what this new model brings to an already crowded and very competitive headphone market.

Interested in high-resolution audio? Then you might want to check our Standards Review column, where we examine the recently announced HDMI 2.0 specification. HDMI 2.0 introduces bandwidth support for Ultra HD/4K televisions, adds up to 32 audio channels and 1,536-kHz audio sample frequency with simultaneous delivery of video and audio streams to multiple users.

In this edition, we interview Craig Bernabeu, founder and chief designer of SBS Designs. He created the company with a former colleague to explore “different approaches to record or play back music that would suit my needs” and realize his vision of “US-made high-end designs with a left-field approach available to users,” as he describes it.

Get ready to shake. Mike Klasco’s and Steve Tatarunis’s article discusses structure-borne vibrational energy with “Bass Shakers: Enhancing the Deep Bass Experience with Tactile Energy.”
This month’s Hollow-State Electronics column is dedicated to the “Effects Of Guitar-Amplifier Design On Distortion Sound.” Richard Honeycutt looks closely at one particular amplifier’s design to determine at what stages most of the distortion occurs.

For those interested in DIY projects, you will enjoy a great concept from Michael Rothacher with his LuminAria: A SIT Preamplifier. The author intended this preamplifier to be “compact enough to fit in a suitcase” and a “good-sounding, unusual preamplifier with a spiffy set of performance specifications.” He completed the project in two months, and it was one of the highlights at the Burning Amp Festival in San Francisco.

In our Audio Electronics column, we have Bill Reeve’s take on “An Alternative to Linear Regulators.” In the article, he searches for equivalent power-line ripple rejection with less power dissipation, because no one wants to listen to an audio amplifier that hums.

We also included a book review and this month we share what we can learn from a master by reading The Bruce Swedien Recording Method.

Your new issue of audioXpress is now available at www.gotomyxpress.com

Q&A: Dan Dugan – Audio Engineer, Inventor, and Nature Sounds Recordist

Dan Dugan

Dan Dugan was the first person in regional theater to be called a “sound designer.” He also developed the first effective automatic microphone mixer—the automixer. He is shown here with his museum rack of Dugan automatic mixers.

SHANNON BECKER: When and how did you first become interested in audio electronics?

DAN DUGAN: As a child! I was most interested in theater lighting. I was raised in San Diego, CA, and when my parents took me to the Old Globe Theatre or the summer musicals in the Ford Bowl, I always wanted to go backstage to see the light board. In grade school, I operated the projectors, the tape recorders (Wollensak and Revere), and the sound systems (Bogen).

SHANNON: When did you attempt your first audio project?

DAN: In grade school, I remember making up a program on tape. Something historical, but I can’t remember what it was about.

SHANNON: Describe some of the jobs you had prior to inventing the automatic microphone mixer.

DAN: After doing all the lighting for four years at the University of San Francisco (USF) College Players and for concerts in the USF Gym, I did sound for the Globe Theatre in 1964 and lighting and sound in 1965, and lighting for the first production of the San Diego Opera in 1965. In 1967, I switched to doing theater sound, working for the San Diego National Shakespeare Festival and the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco.
[The title “Sound Designer” was created in 1968 to describe what Dan was doing. He provided sound services for many seasons of the Mondavi Jazz Festival, and engineered several independent record albums, including Kate Wolf’s first two albums which are still in print, now as CDs].

1978 Globe studio

Dugan was raised in San Diego, CA, where his parents took him to the Old Globe Theatre. Here he is pictured editing sound in a dressing room at the Old Globe Theatre in 1978.

SHANNON: Describe what the term “sound designer” means to you.

DAN: In theaters a “sound designer”  supervises the sound from the microphones to the audience’s ears. In motion picture production there are two meanings. The first is the same as in theater, also called supervising sound editor, and the second usage is for a person who creates novel sounds like monsters.

 

SHANNON: How did you come up with the idea for the automatic microphone mixer?

DAN: In 1968, I did sound design for the resident companies of Hair in Chicago, Las Vegas, and Toronto. There were 36 microphones and one operator working rotary-knob mixers in a rack. I thought there had to be a way to help. I experimented for about six years and hit on a solution.

SHANNON: Tell us about some of your other inventions. Which is the most popular? Are any currently in production?

Model Dugan MY16

One of Dugan’s most popular products is the Dugan-MY16, a 16-channel automatic mixing controller that plugs into a slot on Yamaha consoles. The controller enables sound engineers to manage multiple live microphones without continually riding individual faders. The Dugan-MY16 automatically detects the active microphones and makes fast, transparent cross-fades without the distracting sonic artifacts common to noise gates. It tracks unscripted dialogue and maintains consistent system gain for up to 16 open microphones.

DAN: The Dugan Speech System is my most popular invention. It is 40 years old and still finding new applications. There’s also the Dugan Music System, a distant second, and Dugan Gain Limiting. In limited use but with more coming soon is the Dugan Automatic Level Control. Unrealized as of yet but in the wings are Dugan Foldback Limiting and a Dugan Speech Equalizer.

 

SHANNON: Tell us about “A New Music and Sound Effects System for Theatrical Products,” which is the sound design paper you presented to the Audio Engineering Society (AES) at its 37th Convention. Did you realize its future implications when you wrote it?

DAN: In the paper, I described a system in which the signals from three stereo tape players were routed to 10 loudspeaker zones in the theater. Audio mixing boards generally combine a large number of inputs to a small number of outputs—that’s mixing. For playback of theater cues, the opposite was desired, routing a small number of channels over a large number of speakers. As there was nothing like that available, I designed and built a system from scratch. It was the first multi-scene preset board for theatrical cues playback, sending three stereo tape decks to ten speaker channels. And I described my work in that paper. Subsequently, Charles Richmond, of Richmond Sound Design, designed products developing the concept further.

SHANNON: Your patented equipment has been used in thousands of places, including the courtroom where Saddam Hussein’s trial took place and on the David Letterman Show. Can you share other locations where your equipment may be found?

DAN: My equipment is used in corporate meetings everywhere, from ESPN sports to PAC-12 sports to US Presidential debates and on several television set locations including Washington Week and PBS News Hour.

Model E Series

The Dugan Model E-2 automatic mixing controller is used with multiple live microphones. This updated unit replaces the Dugan Model D-2 as the company’s top-of-the-line automatic mixing controller with analog I/O and is useful for users who are working in tight spaces or who need portability in their analog Dugan system.

SHANNON: Your San Francisco, CA-based company Dan Dugan Sound Design (www.dandugan.com) produces automixing solutions. Are you currently developing any new  products?

DAN: We recently added the Model E-2 to complete the E-series (E-1A, E-2, E-3). We are also just about to ship the Dugan-VN16, an option board for Avid live sound mixers.
Next out for our company will be a new physical control panel for Dugan automixers. It can be used when you are working under pressure and real knobs and buttons are better than mouse clicks.

 

SHANNON: To what do your attribute your company’s continuing success?

DAN: Persistence, good luck.

SHANNON: You are known for your use of natural sound recordings. When and why did you first begin capturing the sounds of nature?

DAN: I was the Northern California service shop for Nagra Audio. Around 1987 or 1988 one of the founders of the Nature Sounds Society worked at the Oakland Museum and he brought a Nagra recorder in for service. He mentioned that every summer they had a camp in the Sierras and invited me to come. I started mentoring with the Nature Sounds Society, teaching people how to get the best sound from their equipment. I started recording for myself at the end of 2001 when I took a borrowed MiniDisc recorder for a trip to New Zealand and I recorded an album’s worth of good stuff.

SHANNON: Where do you conduct your outdoor recordings?

 

Dan Dugan recording

Dugan records ice falls at Upper Yosemite Falls in Yosemite Falls National Park, Mariposa, CA.

DAN: One of my favorite locations is Muir Woods [National Monument in Mill Valley, CA] because it’s so accessible. I also enjoy recording in Mariposa Grove in Yosemite National Park because it is sublime and at Joshua Tree National Park [in southeastern California].

SHANNON: What do you see as some of the greatest audio innovations of your time?

DAN: “Of my time” meaning in my career? I think there are several including solid-state electronics, integrated circuits, electret condenser microphones, and digital audio.

SHANNON: Would you recommend any promising technologies to audioXpress readers?

DAN: Audio over Ethernet.

Sandhill Audio 6011A Redefines the Ribbon Microphone

MicrophoneEstablished in 2008 by sound engineers Riku Pasanen, Petteri Taponen, and Sammy Roiha, Sandhill Audio launched its first (and so far only) product in 2011—the 6011A ribbon microphone.

“We’re continuously working on new designs and prototypes and eventually the range will grow,” Taponen says. “However, any product we release has to justify its existence. We will not put out anything just to have more items in the catalog.”

Sandhill Audio’s 6011A ribbon microphone is designed to produce exceptional sound while being free of the usual limitations of ribbon microphone technology. Although primarily meant for high-end studio applications, the microphone is sufficiently versatile that it can also be used in live environments.

Recently, Funky Junk, Europe’s well-known supplier of new and refurbished professional recording equipment and services, has been appointed exclusive UK distributor by the Finnish microphone manufacturer.

Mark Thompson, managing director of Funky Junk, says that Sandhill Audio has “achieved the seemingly impossible; they’ve designed a microphone that retains the airy warmth of the best ribbon mics with a rugged construction capable of coping with a kick drum, a jumbo jet, or a producer screaming at a tape op. The Sandhill 6011A isn’t cheap, but great performances demand great microphones. We carry demo stock for discerning tests.”

www.sandhillaudio.com
www.proaudioeurope.com

Steinberg, MXL, Mogami, and Yamaha Offer High-Value Recording Packs

Cubase7-UR22RecordingPacksMontageWebFour of the top names in recording, Steinberg, MXL, Mogami, and Yamaha announce the Cubase Recording Pack and the UR22 Recording Pack, two new recording packs that offer musicians, engineers, and producers the best brands in the box.

The Cubase Recording Pack comes with Cubase 7 and the UR22 audio interface from Steinberg, along with an MXL1022 condenser microphone, a MXL-57 shock mount, and a Mogami 10’ XLR-XLR cable. The Cubase Recording Pack also includes a pair of Yamaha RH5MA headphones, which is the final component in this instant recording studio solution.

The second bundle, the hardware-oriented UR22 Recording Pack, features the UR22, an MXL1022 condenser microphone, an MXL-57 shock mount, and a Mogami 10’ XLR-XLR cable. The UR22 Recording Pack is designed for first-time audio interface users who seek a high-quality solution featuring trustworthy brands.

One of the world’s most popular digital audio workstations, the Cubase 7 features the new MixConsole, enhanced workflow options, and a new channel strip that offers epic pro-console sound. The rock-solid UR22 USB 2.0 audio interface includes two D-PRE preamps and 192-kHz support, providing professional-grade sound in a portable package.

The MXL1022 large-diaphragm condenser microphone captures vocals and instruments in crisp detail. It features an FET preamp with balanced output and wide frequency response to pick up a broad range of sound, from vocals to a variety of instruments. The microphone is internally wired with world-class Mogami cable for precise recordings and, when placed into the MXL-57 shock mount, ensures professional performance.

The 10’ XLR-XLR Cable from Mogami, the largest-selling cable brand for major recording facilities, delivers the purest recordings. Each cable is made from Mogami’s 2552 microphone cable with signature Mogami 100% spiral coverage for extremely low noise. The cable is finished with high quality gold-contact XLR connectors.
Yamaha RH5MA headphones, which provide accurate sound reproduction, represent an excellent choice for pro studio monitoring. Featuring a semi-closed design, they come with 0.25” and 0.125” inch jacks along with an 8’ long cable. The frequency response is 20 Hz to 20 kHz and the impedance is 32 Ω.

The Cubase Recording Pack costs $1,119.99. The UR22 Recording Pack costs $439.99.

The Cubase Recording Pack includes Cubase 7 Upgrade 4 to “upgrade” the existing license, pre-loaded onto the included eLicenser USB key. The UR22 Recording Pack includes a Full Version of Cubase AI 7.

TurboCal Provides a Low-Cost Solution

HAA’s TurboCal Suite is designed for quick acoustic calibrations.

HAA’s TurboCal Suite is designed for quick acoustic calibrations.

Home Acoustics Alliance (HAA) now offers an audio TurboCal package. This kit is designed for quick acoustic calibrations you suitable for every job. AVPro 2.0 will even walk you through the process. With this setup, you only need to add the AVPro iMux 4 and you will have the complete professional kit. Just add an iPad and a few apps.

The kit includes an iAudioInterface2 preamp/generator, an HAA-approved Type 2 measurement microphone, AVPro 2.0 audio reporting software, and a SC05 sound-level calibrator. The TurboCal package costs $1,150.

For more information, visit www.avproalliance.com.

Avid Announces Automixing Dugan-VN16 Option Card for Avid Live Systems

AvidDuganOptionWebDesigned to help live sound professionals meet the most demanding and complex workflow challenges, the Dugan-VN16 card offers a modular, integrated solution that improves audio quality and simplifies mixing for multi-microphone applications.

Developed and manufactured by Dan Dugan Sound Design, the Dugan-VN16 option card provides Avid live system users with industry-leading dialog automixing functionality, improving audio quality in situations where multiple speech microphones are used, including broadcast events, conferences, house of worship services, theater performances, and more.

The card automatically adjusts microphone levels faster than what would be possible using manual workflows. Unlike a noise gate, which can introduce distracting sonic artifacts, the Dugan patented technology utilizes real-time voice activation to automatically lower the volume of unused live speech microphones and raise volume when presenters begin speaking, greatly reducing feedback, comb filtering, and background noise without having to manually adjust levels.

The Dugan-VN16 card is available for the Avid SC48, FOH Rack- or Mix Rack-based systems. It manages and mixes up to 16 open microphones with 16 channels of ADAT optical I/O, offering three operating modes to fit different application needs, via the Dugan Control Panel software (included) or the Dugan Control Panel for iPad (sold separately). For more information, visit www.avid.com.

NTi XL2-TA Receives Type Approval

The XL2-TA Sound Level Meter has received Class 1 approval.

The XL2-TA Sound Level Meter has received Class 1 approval.

The XL2-TA sound level meter has received Class 1 type-approval from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. The XL2-TA in combination with the M2230 measurement microphone, is officially listed as a type-approved Class 1 sound level meter. The XL2-TA is suitable for environmental noise, occupational health, and sound insulation applications where the measurements require certification.

Receipt of the type-approval certificate confirms the XL2-TA (in combination with the M2230 measurement microphone and the ASD cable) offers full compliance with the Class 1 sound level meter requirements in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards 61672 and 61260 and meets the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S1.4 Type 1 performance. The XL2-TA offers certified spectral measurements in octave and third-octave resolution, which further comply with Class 0 filter specifications.

The M2230 measurement microphone connected to the XL2-TA via the ASD cable configuration enables the user to monitor the level readings on the instrument display while Class 1 measurements are taken. The NTi Audio Precision Calibrator completes the portable measurement kit offered in the compact system case.

Customers may upgrade their XL2 analyzers to a type-approved XL2-TA by adding a retrofit kit. Contact your local NTi Audio partner for the upgrade. For more information about the XL2 Analyzer and obtaining the type-approval 0ption, visit www.nti-audio.com/XL2.