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2014 Media Kit

The Loudspeaker Industry Sourcebook captures the attention of thousands of OEM buyers from around the world each year. A targeted directory, loudspeaker professionals turn to this listing of manufacturers, suppliers, and distributors because it gives them instant access to everything they need to build great products: from drivers to finished systems, microspeakers to headphones, crossovers to voice coils, and everything in between.

Nearing its 20th edition, the 2014 Loudspeaker Industry Sourcebook is the only resource of its kind. Delivered to thousands of loudspeaker professionals as a NEW searchable, online directory, e-pub, and magazine, it’s only complete when you add your products, services, and specialties.

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Sennheiser’s New DJ Headphones Redefine Professional Performance

Sennheiser HD8-DJ

Sennheiser HD8-DJ

German audio specialist Sennheiser has led the professional audio market for more than two decades with its HD 25 headphones used by the world’s leading music producers and DJs. Sennheiser recently introduced at the CES 2014 in Las Vegas its new range of professional DJ and mixing headphones. Designed for the most demanding users and punishing pro environments, the HD8 DJ, the HD7 DJ, and the HD6 MIX have been developed in conjunction with some of the world’s top DJs—among them Bob Sinclar, Luciano, Andy Baxter, Missill, and Davina.

The three new headphones deliver excellent, dynamic sound reproduction with the highest levels of external noise attenuation, using durable materials and with exceptional build-quality.

The new headphones are inspired by the dynamic sound reproduction of the HD 25.

“Drawing on our success based around the HD 25 and extensive experience in high-end audio, the DJ range applies Sennheiser’s proprietary acoustic system to answer the needs of different performing and production applications,” says Ivan Kuan, head of Product Management, Sennheiser Consumer Electronics.

The HD8 DJ is dedicated to the needs of professional DJs with excellent sound reproduction, while the HD7 DJ offers an engaging, dynamic sound that’s perfect for playing live. Both delivering a mid-low end emphasis, the sound remains tight and never overwhelms, with clarity retained in the high frequencies. Meanwhile, the HD6 MIX, a model aimed primarily at studio-based music creation, delivers a balanced, accurate sound for mixing and monitoring work. “To hear every detail, the elliptical, circumaural ear cups were specially designed to ensure a perfect fit for more users. This provides excellent external noise attenuation that can cope with very high sound pressure levels for safer listening without turning up the volume excessively,” Kuan says.

The DJ headphone range is built for user comfort for hours at the decks, in the studio, or performing. The elliptical shape of the ear cups also avoids pinching the ears and is enhanced by interchangeable ear pads for comfortable listening during long periods of use. For hassle-free one-ear monitoring, both DJ models feature swiveling ear cups with up to 210° of movement and three different wearing positions. With both coiled and straight 3-m high-performance cables included that can connect to either ear cup, these headphones can adapt to suit any individual preference. A bayonet twist lock makes for secure connection to the headphones.

All three models are built to withstand the rigors of daily studio work and a life on the road. Sennheiser has engineered the range from durable, high-quality materials to take even the roughest everyday professional use, proven through rigorous and extended quality tests. And when the life on the road pushes the limits too far, Sennheiser’s new headphones offer replaceable parts and a commitment to customer service offering at least a five-year parts availability guarantee, even after end-of-life, and global support for quick replacements.

Key features:

  • Excellent sound reproduction with Sennheiser’s proprietary acoustics system
  • Capable of very high SPLs, suitable for DJ performance environments
  • DJ models: impedance of 95 Ω for optimum compatibility with DJ equipment
  • Monitoring model: impedance of 150 Ω for optimum compatibility with studio and mixing equipment
  • Elliptical, circumaural design for maximum comfort and excellent noise isolation; both DJ models feature swiveling ear cups (up to 210°) with three wearing positions
  • Top-of-the-range HD8 DJ model features metal-crafted reinforcement parts with an metal pivot ring
  • Single-sided coiled cable attachable to either ear cup; additional straight cable included (both up to 3m); oxygen-free copper cable with gold-plated connectors; bayonet twist lock for secure connection
  • All models come with interchangeable sets of ear pads to choose from; one in soft velour, the other in leatherette material

 

www.sennheiser.com

Q&A: Dan Dugan – Audio Engineer, Inventor, and Nature Sounds Recordist

Dan Dugan

Dan Dugan was the first person in regional theater to be called a “sound designer.” He also developed the first effective automatic microphone mixer—the automixer. He is shown here with his museum rack of Dugan automatic mixers.

SHANNON BECKER: When and how did you first become interested in audio electronics?

DAN DUGAN: As a child! I was most interested in theater lighting. I was raised in San Diego, CA, and when my parents took me to the Old Globe Theatre or the summer musicals in the Ford Bowl, I always wanted to go backstage to see the light board. In grade school, I operated the projectors, the tape recorders (Wollensak and Revere), and the sound systems (Bogen).

SHANNON: When did you attempt your first audio project?

DAN: In grade school, I remember making up a program on tape. Something historical, but I can’t remember what it was about.

SHANNON: Describe some of the jobs you had prior to inventing the automatic microphone mixer.

DAN: After doing all the lighting for four years at the University of San Francisco (USF) College Players and for concerts in the USF Gym, I did sound for the Globe Theatre in 1964 and lighting and sound in 1965, and lighting for the first production of the San Diego Opera in 1965. In 1967, I switched to doing theater sound, working for the San Diego National Shakespeare Festival and the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco.
[The title “Sound Designer” was created in 1968 to describe what Dan was doing. He provided sound services for many seasons of the Mondavi Jazz Festival, and engineered several independent record albums, including Kate Wolf’s first two albums which are still in print, now as CDs].

1978 Globe studio

Dugan was raised in San Diego, CA, where his parents took him to the Old Globe Theatre. Here he is pictured editing sound in a dressing room at the Old Globe Theatre in 1978.

SHANNON: Describe what the term “sound designer” means to you.

DAN: In theaters a “sound designer”  supervises the sound from the microphones to the audience’s ears. In motion picture production there are two meanings. The first is the same as in theater, also called supervising sound editor, and the second usage is for a person who creates novel sounds like monsters.

 

SHANNON: How did you come up with the idea for the automatic microphone mixer?

DAN: In 1968, I did sound design for the resident companies of Hair in Chicago, Las Vegas, and Toronto. There were 36 microphones and one operator working rotary-knob mixers in a rack. I thought there had to be a way to help. I experimented for about six years and hit on a solution.

SHANNON: Tell us about some of your other inventions. Which is the most popular? Are any currently in production?

Model Dugan MY16

One of Dugan’s most popular products is the Dugan-MY16, a 16-channel automatic mixing controller that plugs into a slot on Yamaha consoles. The controller enables sound engineers to manage multiple live microphones without continually riding individual faders. The Dugan-MY16 automatically detects the active microphones and makes fast, transparent cross-fades without the distracting sonic artifacts common to noise gates. It tracks unscripted dialogue and maintains consistent system gain for up to 16 open microphones.

DAN: The Dugan Speech System is my most popular invention. It is 40 years old and still finding new applications. There’s also the Dugan Music System, a distant second, and Dugan Gain Limiting. In limited use but with more coming soon is the Dugan Automatic Level Control. Unrealized as of yet but in the wings are Dugan Foldback Limiting and a Dugan Speech Equalizer.

 

SHANNON: Tell us about “A New Music and Sound Effects System for Theatrical Products,” which is the sound design paper you presented to the Audio Engineering Society (AES) at its 37th Convention. Did you realize its future implications when you wrote it?

DAN: In the paper, I described a system in which the signals from three stereo tape players were routed to 10 loudspeaker zones in the theater. Audio mixing boards generally combine a large number of inputs to a small number of outputs—that’s mixing. For playback of theater cues, the opposite was desired, routing a small number of channels over a large number of speakers. As there was nothing like that available, I designed and built a system from scratch. It was the first multi-scene preset board for theatrical cues playback, sending three stereo tape decks to ten speaker channels. And I described my work in that paper. Subsequently, Charles Richmond, of Richmond Sound Design, designed products developing the concept further.

SHANNON: Your patented equipment has been used in thousands of places, including the courtroom where Saddam Hussein’s trial took place and on the David Letterman Show. Can you share other locations where your equipment may be found?

DAN: My equipment is used in corporate meetings everywhere, from ESPN sports to PAC-12 sports to US Presidential debates and on several television set locations including Washington Week and PBS News Hour.

Model E Series

The Dugan Model E-2 automatic mixing controller is used with multiple live microphones. This updated unit replaces the Dugan Model D-2 as the company’s top-of-the-line automatic mixing controller with analog I/O and is useful for users who are working in tight spaces or who need portability in their analog Dugan system.

SHANNON: Your San Francisco, CA-based company Dan Dugan Sound Design (www.dandugan.com) produces automixing solutions. Are you currently developing any new  products?

DAN: We recently added the Model E-2 to complete the E-series (E-1A, E-2, E-3). We are also just about to ship the Dugan-VN16, an option board for Avid live sound mixers.
Next out for our company will be a new physical control panel for Dugan automixers. It can be used when you are working under pressure and real knobs and buttons are better than mouse clicks.

 

SHANNON: To what do your attribute your company’s continuing success?

DAN: Persistence, good luck.

SHANNON: You are known for your use of natural sound recordings. When and why did you first begin capturing the sounds of nature?

DAN: I was the Northern California service shop for Nagra Audio. Around 1987 or 1988 one of the founders of the Nature Sounds Society worked at the Oakland Museum and he brought a Nagra recorder in for service. He mentioned that every summer they had a camp in the Sierras and invited me to come. I started mentoring with the Nature Sounds Society, teaching people how to get the best sound from their equipment. I started recording for myself at the end of 2001 when I took a borrowed MiniDisc recorder for a trip to New Zealand and I recorded an album’s worth of good stuff.

SHANNON: Where do you conduct your outdoor recordings?

 

Dan Dugan recording

Dugan records ice falls at Upper Yosemite Falls in Yosemite Falls National Park, Mariposa, CA.

DAN: One of my favorite locations is Muir Woods [National Monument in Mill Valley, CA] because it’s so accessible. I also enjoy recording in Mariposa Grove in Yosemite National Park because it is sublime and at Joshua Tree National Park [in southeastern California].

SHANNON: What do you see as some of the greatest audio innovations of your time?

DAN: “Of my time” meaning in my career? I think there are several including solid-state electronics, integrated circuits, electret condenser microphones, and digital audio.

SHANNON: Would you recommend any promising technologies to audioXpress readers?

DAN: Audio over Ethernet.

New Westone Signature W50/60 Earphones Introduced at the CES 2014

Westone Signature W50/60 Earphones

Westone Signature W50/60 Earphones

Westone, a manufacturer of high-performance audio and in-ear monitoring technology, has announced its new signature series W50 and W60 model earphones. Combining the latest in design with elite performance drivers and crossovers, the Signature W-Series is intended to continue the award-winning success of the Westone lineup while providing state-of-the art audio performance combined with superior design for improved comfort and fit. The W60, the brand’s first to offer six drivers, was awarded Digital Trends’s “Best Of CES 2014″ Award in the earphone category, rising above five other nominees.

The Signature W-Series features Westone’s proprietary balanced armature drivers and advanced crossover designs. The W60 includes six balanced armature drivers—dual driver for the tweeters, midranges, and bass—and multistage crossover designs (three-way), generating a powerful yet balanced sound that offers great detail and high-energy output. The W60 will be available in the first quarter of 2014 and will retail at $999.

The W50 model features five individual drivers in each earphone with the same three-way crossover. It will be available in the first quarter of 2014 with a suggested retail price of $749.99.

The W-Series is supplied with two replaceable cables—the EPIC cable for easy replacement or custom cable selection, as well as an Apple MFi cable with three-button controls and an integrated microphone. An Android control cable is available as an accessory. The new connector is compatible with all the new Westone cables including the ADV reflective cable and the new UM Pro cable. The EPIC replaceable cable is constructed of high-flex, ultra-low resistance tensile wire, reinforced with a special aramid fiber, and braided for durability, acoustic transparency, and isolation from mechanical cable noise. The new audiophile connector makes this cable solution conveniently user-removable, upgradeable, and replaceable.

The W-Series features interchangeable anodized aluminum faceplates (red, blue, and charcoal included), a straight EPIC replaceable cable, a replaceable MFi cable and MIC, an Executive Monitor Vault, a weather-resistant travel case, and five sizes of patented STAR and True-Fit Tips. With Westone True-Fit technology, the company combines 50-plus years experience with in-ear applications that have produced a low-profile, lightweight, universal earpiece that delivers maximum comfort and in-ear coupling for dynamic music listening.

“The W-Series is the latest in high performance earphones, designed and engineered for music lovers and audiophiles,” said John F. Lowrey, Vice President, Audio Group at Westone. “The W-Series represents superior sound performance, fit, and features that showcase the detail and clarity of the music.”

http://www.westoneaudio.com

Industry Watch: February 2014

New President Heads MartinLogan, Paradigm, and Anthem

Rocco Melchione recently accepted the position of president/CEO for the Paradigm, MartinLogan, and Anthem brands. He replaces Tim Valters, who held that title for the last four years. Melchione has more than 20 years of experience at the senior executive level in global manufacturing and sales, the company said. His experience includes global supply-chain management, process improvement, and quality practices,

Melchione also had a leadership role in the expansion of a global division of Panasonic and helped integrate Baldwin Piano into Gibson Guitar Corp. as a Gibson subsidiary, the company added. Senior management teams for all three brands report directly to him.

ShoreView Industries, the parent company for the three brands, ShoreView Industries, owns 100% of MartinLogan and more than 50% of Paradigm Electronics, which includes the Paradigm and Anthem brands. The remaining percentage of Paradigm Electronics is owned by Scott Bagby, one of the company’s founding partners. Despite the change, the company said it will continue to focus on its specialty audio retailing.

 

 


 

Fujitsu Ten’s Eclipse Brand Returns to CE

Fujitsu Ten’s Eclipse brand, which left the car audio aftermarket in 2010 after 21 years, is making a US comeback in the home-audio market (see Photo 1). The Japanese company displayed its current range of stand-mounted, tapered, sphere-shaped home speakers ($490/pair to $11,200/pair) at the 2014 International CES (January 7–10 in Las Vegas, NV).

Fujitsu Ten Eclipse

Fujitsu Ten’s Eclipse brand now offers the TD-M1 speakers
($1,300/pair) with Wi-Fi, AirPlay, AirPlay Direct, DLNA, USB B to connect to a PC/Mac, USB A to connect to an iPhone/iPod touch, and a 192-kHz/24-bit DAC.

Fujitsu Ten also introduced a pair of high-end powered subwoofers—the TD725SW MK2 ($7,000) and the TD520SW ($4,500)—and a wireless Airplay speaker. The AirPlay speaker, shaped like the company’s other tapered spherical speakers, is called the TD-M1 ($1,300/pair). The new products ship in February 2014. The company’s current speakers became available in January 2014.

The new audio Eclipse brand entered the home speaker market in Japan in 2001 and has expanded its line to Asia and Europe. Although the brand was briefly in the US some years ago, the Eclipse home audio brand is ready to “properly” enter the US home market in February 2014. Both subwoofers are said to combine power and speed. They use two small-diameter drivers in a back-to-back configuration linked by an aluminum bar. The configuration combines small-diameter driver speed with large-diameter driver power.

Both subwoofers feature Class-D amplifiers, a low-pass filter bypass, an IR remote, and a selector to switch between 5.1- or 2.1-channel inputs. They deliver 500 W and 250 W, respectively, of nominal output with 1% total harmonic distortion (THD). The playback range is 20–150 Hz and 25–150 Hz, respectively. The larger model measures 21.5” × 19.7” × 20.6”.

The AirPlay speaker, which also features time-domain technology, comes with Wi-Fi, AirPlay, AirPlay Direct, DLNA, USB B to connect to a PC/Mac, USB A to connect to an iPhone/iPod touch, and a 192-kHz/24-bit DAC. An iPhone app is available for remote control of power, volume, and input switching.

The DAC provides users the option to remove the oversampling filter during the playback process. Oversampling filters remove noise that occurs when digital sound is converted into analog. The speaker’s oversampling-free mode removes the oversampling filter for enhanced clarity, the company noted.

The speaker features a Class-D amplifier, touch-sensor controls, and a speaker-angle adjustment, which enables users to choose different angles (0°–20°) with a single touch to optimize imaging for a given listening location.

A 3.5-mm input enables connection to TVs and other devices. The speaker measures 6.1” × 8.6” × 9.5” and features ring 3” drivers, a 70-Hz-to-30-kHz frequency response, and 20-W nominal output at 1% THD.

 


 

Atlantic Technology Adds Bluetooth to Its Powered H-PAS Soundbar

While Atlantic Technology (AT) has lowered the price of its PowerBar from $799 to $699, the big news is that the PowerBar now includes Bluetooth capability. The included Bluetooth receiver features nearfield communications (NFC) for tap-to-connect functionality and streams the aptX codec over Bluetooth. The Bluetooth 4.0 receiver connects to the soundbar via the bar’s analog audio input.
The AT product stands out because of its unique H-PAS technology that delivers bass to 47 Hz at “theater-level sound pressure levels (SPLs).” Typical soundbars usually have 150-to-200-Hz capabilities. The H-PAS also improves dialog clarity because of the low woofer excursion that produces less bass distortion. The AT PowerBar also incorporates DSP with Dolby Digital and DTS to deliver a two-to-five-channel experience.

Antelope Audio Displays Zodiac Platinum DSD DAC and Rubicon Preamplifier

AntelopeAntelope Audio displayed its new Zodiac Platinum direct-stream digital (DSD) DAC and Rubicon A/D D/A Preamplifier at CES International 2014 in Las Vegas. The demonstrations explored Antelope’s upsampling innovations and the role that superior clocking plays in an audiophile digital listening environment.

The Zodiac Platinum brings the digital-audio listening experience to a new level with its unique 256x DSD upsampling mode, which enables users to upsample DSD64 and DSD128 files to DSD256—unleashing the true potential of DSD.

In addition to the Zodiac Platinum, Antelope Audio showed its CES 2013 Innovations Award-winning Rubicon Atomic A/D D/A preamplifier—a DSD128, 24-bit, 384-kHz converter, phono stage preamplifier, and headphone amplifier with an integrated atomic clock. During the presentations at CES, the Zodiac Platinum and the Rubicon were connected to a pair of ATC SM100-AMT studio reference loudspeakers and there were A/B listening comparisons between analog source material and digital recordings using Antelope Audio playback systems.

www.antelopeaudio.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AntelopeAudio

One More Take

“One more take.”

Remember that joke? The producer in the recording studio says to the band: “Not bad, fellas. Let’s do one more take, this time with more emphasis on tone, harmony, melody, rhythm, composition, lyrics, musicianship, tempo, and originality.”

Maybe it’s time for the audio industry to try “one more take.”

During last year’s 135th Audio Engineering Society (AES) Convention in New York, it was apparent that the audio engineering community unites several generations. Also, the younger but much more technically perceptive generation is fascinated by the achievements of those who had the “privilege” of working in the big studios and doing audio production for live concerts, or during great broadcast moments from the 1960s, the 1970s, and the 1980s.

The younger generations have learned to value the tools and what they can do with them. They even value the “good old analog” electronics, essentially by using plug-in emulations of the real things inside Pro Tools or Logic. Yet, this generation also encodes studio recordings to MP3s.

From one content format to another, the music industry continually re-released its content in physical media until the Super Audio CD (SACD) and the Blu-ray disc (on video) formats appeared. And that was it. Suddenly, the Internet, mobile devices, and digital files changed everything. With that change came the MP3, the iPod, iTunes, and mobile networks. This accelerated the demise of physical media, on which the entire music industry had become over-dependent.

Meanwhile, technology continues to evolve. Even though SACD is dead and gone, the key developments remain valid and high-resolution audio is still a logical proposition. But is it well understood by the “plug-in” generation? A very faint sign of hope emits from the enthusiasm detected at events such as the AES conventions and the NAMM shows.

With new 64-bit processors and OSes becoming the norm, large bandwith networks available everywhere, and memory and storage increasing faster than consumers’ actual needs, it seems the industry is ripe for another go at quality.

As our contributing author Gary Galo noted in his impressions of the 135th AES Convention, it seems consumers are rediscovering the virtues of high-resolution sound and finding compressed formats such as MP3 unacceptable. But at the same time, mobile platforms and wireless networks have created new consumer behaviors. People are increasingly listening to music via headphones, soundbars, and portable wireless loudspeakers. Therefore, we need a new approach to address that changing landscape, and it’s not going to be with $20,000 home stereo (or multichannel) systems.

If downloading high-resolution audio files is practical and inspires a new group of record companies to reinvest in high-quality content production, it is clear that 1-bit DSD recordings could also breathe new life into studios, the pro audio industry in general, and even many high-end audio brands.

And it is at forums such as the Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, CA—where those same generations again meet with producers and musicians—that the conscience needs to be raised. Not at the Venetian Hotel demo rooms in Las Vegas, NV. The signs are still fragile, the economic environment remains unstable, and the market trends are uncertain, but it all seems to be aligning for a “new take” in the audio industry.

João Martins
Editor-in-Chief

Apogee Announces Symphony Thunderbolt Compatibility with Apple’s New Mac Pro

ApogeeApogee Electronics confirms its multichannel Thunderbolt audio-recording solution is fully compatible with the new Apple Mac Pro. Apogee’s Symphony System (Symphony I/O and Symphony 64 | ThunderBridge) offers up to 64 channels of AD/DA conversion to any Thunderbolt-equipped Mac computer. Combined with the unprecedented power of the new Mac Pro, the incredible speed and bandwidth of Thunderbolt and creative possibilities of Logic Pro X and all other Core Audio-compatible applications, the Apogee Symphony System becomes a powerful and very attractive professional audio workstation configuration.

The Symphony I/O + Symphony 64 | ThunderBridge modular solution supports up to 192 kHz/24-bit recording with a latency of 1.8 ms at 96kHz/32 buffer and features two Thunderbolt ports for connecting additional peripherals.
http://www.apogeedigital.com

Extron XTP DTP 24 Twisted Pair Cable Receives HDBaseT Recommendation

CableExtron Electronics announced that Extron XTP DTP 24 shielded twisted pair cable has been independently tested in an HDBaseT Alliance Recognized Testing Facility and verified to exceed performance requirements for recommendation by the Alliance.

The HDBaseT Alliance’s Cable Recommendation Program helps audio video (AV) installers select cables that are engineered for optimum signal transmission within a twisted pair infrastructure. Extron XTP DTP 24 cable is specifically engineered to improve performance and signal path reliability with Extron XTP systems, DTP systems, and HDBaseT applications. The cable is available in both plenum and non-plenum versions, and is certified to 475 MHz bandwidth at distances up to 330′ (100 m).

“When Extron got into the AV cable business many years ago, we quickly determined that off-the-shelf bulk cable didn’t meet our standards for performance, reliability, and durability, so we design all of our cables in-house,” says Casey Hall, vice president of sales and marketing for Extron. “XTP DTP 24 cable is engineered specifically for digital video applications to provide integrators with absolute confidence in signal integrity throughout the largest distribution systems. While primarily intended for use with Extron XTP systems and DTP series products, the XTP DTP 24 cable can be used in any HDBaseT application for an additional measure of performance and reliability.”

Extron XTP DTP 24 cable is performance-optimized, 24 AWG shielded twisted pair cable specifically engineered to Extron’s  standards of performance. The cable utilizes an SF/UTP shielded foil/unshielded twisted pair design for superior performance in digital video and audio distribution system applications and features 24 AWG solid copper conductors within overall braid and foil shields. Both non-plenum and plenum-rated versions are available in spools of 1,000′ (305 m). To ensure end-to-end cable infrastructure performance, a line of matching shielded RJ-45 plugs, punch down jacks, and couplers is also available.

www.extron.com

Fraunhofer IIS Introduces Audio Codec Optimized for Television at CES

3-D AudioThe German R&D institute, Fraunhofer IIS (developers of mp3 and co-developers of AAC),  previewed the future of audio entertainment for TV broadcasts at CES International 2014 in Las Vegas, where it is unveiled the new Fraunhofer TV audio system based on the upcoming open audio standard MPEG-H Audio.

The Fraunhofer TV audio system is destined to push TV broadcasts to a new level and provide viewers with interactive features that offer control over the audio signal and true 3-D sound. As one of the main developers of MPEG-H Audio, Fraunhofer IIS is leading the evolution of television playback well beyond 5.1 surround sound.

“Throughout the development of the new Fraunhofer TV audio system based on MPEG-H Audio, Fraunhofer IIS focused on the needs of current and future TV broadcasts audiences for viewing content on a variety of devices from complete home theaters to mobile tablets and phones,” said Harald Popp, head of the business department of the audio and multimedia division of Fraunhofer IIS. “As a result, the system is a true multiscreen audio codec allowing for the efficient delivery of audio content to any screen over any kind of transmission channel, including broadcast, cable, Internet or 4G wireless networks.”
MPEG-H Audio is based on a new, efficient audio codec that includes processing to offer an optimized experience with controlled loudness on every device. It includes object-based audio and is capable of transmitting immersive 3-D sound. Object-based audio allows viewers to adjust the sound mix to their preferences, boosting otherwise hard-to-understand dialogue or creating a “home team” mix of sports broadcasts.